The League School of Greater Boston was named Greater Boston’s Best Special Needs High School by the Boston Parents Paper. The Middle School earned a top-eight ranking in the Special Needs Middle School category. Boston Parent Paper readers voted in a two-round for their “Family Favorite” in a number of categories, including Special Needs Services and Resources, during March and April. The results were published in the July edition of the Paper.

In its 11th year, the “Family Favorites” poll gives parents the opportunity to promote the people, places, and things that make the Greater Boston area the best place to raise a family. This recognition wouldn’t be possible without our dedicated Pathfinders staff and the work they do every day to prepare students for future success. Visit Boston Parents Paper to see all of the “Family Favorites.”

“The Parents Paper ‘Best Special Needs High School’ and ‘Top Special Needs Middle School’ designations speak to the strength of our staff and the League School’s Pathfinders Program, which prepares students for future success” said Dr. Frank Gagliardi, Executive Director of League School of Greater Boston. “The majority of our students pass MCAS and graduate from high school. Many go onto college. This recognition gives us another reason to celebrate our wonderful staff and the work they do every day to help students thrive.”

Founded in 1966 and located in Walpole, Massachusetts, the League School of Greater Boston is a leading private day and residential school for students ages 3 to 22 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The School’s innovative and comprehensive SCERTS® development approach encompasses the challenges people with autism face every day: Social Communication, Emotional Regulation, and Transactional Support. Under this umbrella are four programs based on age that provide each child with the skill sets they need to succeed while at school and later in their community. 

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