Content Teaching, Community, and Life Skills Development

In this program, classrooms are divided by age and skill level, with differentiated instruction according to the learning styles of each student complemented by a focus on functional academics, social communication, emotional regulation, daily life skills, and pre-vocational training.

The Content Teaching/Life Skills Program is designed for students ages 11-16.

Classrooms focus on academics, social communication, emotional regulation, daily life skills, and pre-vocational training. At League School, students are exposed to a small school environment that is sensory friendly with reduced auditory and visual stimuli.

Program Overview

Classrooms are divided by age and skill level, with differentiated instruction according to the learning styles of each student. Each classroom has one head teacher and an assistant teacher.  In addition, the Content Teaching/Life Skills Program is supported by a team consisting of a clinician, an occupational therapist, a speech- language pathologist, a behavior staff person, a part-time physical therapist and a program coordinator that are on site. The classroom teams meet weekly before students arrive to discuss the needs of the students and any important issues.  In order to keep parents and guardians informed, there is daily communication from the classroom teachers either by email or communication notebooks.  For those students in our League School residences, there is daily email that provides communication between the school, parent, and residential staff to share important information.

SCERTS Model

The Content Teaching/Life Skills Program has integrated the SCERTS Model into our teaching.  We provide a coordinated transdisciplinary approach to assessment and educational programming that includes educators, speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists, clinicians and behavior therapists.

Curriculum

Academic skills are based upon the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. The academic curriculum is tailored to meet the individual student. Each classroom provides a structured, center based environment with direct instruction.  Instruction is provided in small group with multiple opportunities for naturalistic generalization.  Students work on a range of skills from name recognition and identifying money to answering comprehension questions and discussing current events.  Students participate in a daily hygiene routine. Also a part of the student’s school week are courses taught by our specialists, including music, art, and adaptive physical education.

Accomodations

Each of the classrooms is framed around the following concepts:

  • Structured classroom environment
  • Direct instruction with errorless teaching
  • Content Teaching
  • Small group instruction with multiple opportunities for naturalistic generalization
  • Fostering of skill independence utilizing visual supports
  • Positive behavioral supports
  • Social communication
  • Emotional regulation
  • Sensory strategies including breaks, tools, and visuals
  • Co-taught language and motor skill group by the SLP and OT

Community Experiences

Community trips are part of the learning environment. Teachers make extensive use of the community to teach students to generalize their academic, daily living, safety, communication, and social skills across a variety of settings and to develop more independence and safety awareness.  Our goal is to enable students to gain a sense of independence through venues within both the school and community. During trips in the community, students participate in shopping experiences to stores, ordering food in a restaurant, participating in the outdoor activities, and going to the post office in order to practice their skills in different settings with a variety of people.

Vocational Experiences

Pre-vocational training is an added focus of the curriculum in the Content Teaching/Life Skills Program. All of our students are provided the opportunity to participate in a variety of pre-vocational experiences in the vocational center and classroom.  Students are exposed to clerical tasks, office machine use, housekeeping activities, and packaging tasks. As students progress, they have the opportunity to work in our school store, the Hawk’s Nest. All students earn money for their participation in vocational training and then get an opportunity each week to cash their checks at a local bank.

Community and Life Skills Development

Community Life Skills (CLS) services students ages 11-16 who have more limited verbal abilities and is run in three separate classrooms which are divided based upon students’ needs and age.

CLS places a focus on functional academics, social communication, emotional regulation, daily life skills, and pre-vocational training. All academics are based off the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks with lessons developed to provide meaningful real-life application. Students receive direct instruction of social skills, adapted daily living skills and vocational skills that are then generalized into natural settings. Each of the classrooms is framed around the following concepts:

  • Structured classroom environment
  • Direct instruction with errorless teaching
  • 1:1 and small group instruction with multiple opportunities for naturalistic generalization
  • Fostering of skill independence utilizing visual supports
  • Positive behavioral supports
  • Social communication
  • Emotional regulation

Students also work on a range of skills from name recognition and identifying money to answering comprehension questions and discussing current events. Frequent community trips offer important living skill lessons such as using a shopping list, ordering food in a restaurant and going to the post office.